Raymond Abellio: A Modern Day Cathar?...

By PHILIP COPPENS Déodat Roche may not be the only modern Cathar. Another candidate put forward for such a distinction is ‘Raymond Abellio’. Raymond Abellio is the pseudonym of French writer and political activist Georges Soulès. Already, in his choice of nom de plume, there is a direct reference to the solar deity of the Pyrenees, often linked with Apollo – and Lucifer, the Light Bearer. It was, in fact, Otto Rahn himself who made the link between Lucifer and Abellio. Abellio was a deity of Soulès’ homeland, especially the Garonne Valley in Gallia Aquitania. His existence is known through a number of inscriptions that were discovered at Comminges. He may have been a god of apple trees. Equally, though Raymond is a name of Germanic origin, composed of the elements ragin (‘counsellor’) and mund (‘protector’), the name was, at the time of Catharism, specifically linked with the counts of Toulouse. The choice of protector and counsellor of the deity of light is apt to describe what Soulès envisioned to be his mission in life. Soulès was born November 11, 1907 in Toulouse, and died August 26, 1986 in Nice. His parents came from Ax-les-Thermes, in the Ariège valley, only 16 kilometres from the ancient Cathar castle at Montségur. Soulès was a brilliant student, and during his engineering studies discovered an interest in politics and became a staunch supporter of Marxism. He joined the Étudiants Socialist of the XIV arrondissement of Paris, affiliated to the French Socialist party (SFIO). Here he befriended the celebrated political philosopher Claude Lévi-Strausse. Amongst his tutors was Marcel Deat, the politician and philosopher who formed his own party, the Parti Socialiste de France, under the motto ‘Order, Authority and Nation’. In 1931, at the age of 24, he joined...

What in the World is a Gnostic?...

By DR. STEPHAN A. HOELLER Are we witnessing a rediscovery of Gnosticism? To judge from the burgeoning new literature and the increased use of the terms “gnosis” and “Gnosticism” in popular publications, the answer would seem to be yes. Only twenty-five years ago, when one used the word “Gnostic,” it was very likely to be misunderstood as “agnostic,” and thus have one’s statement turned into its exact opposite. Such misapprehensions are far less likely today. Nevertheless, increased academic attention (beginning with the discovery of the Nag Hammadi scriptures in 1945) and the ensuing popular interest have produced a confusion of tongues which is anything but helpful for the sincere inquirer into matters Gnostic. It is often difficult even to tell what is meant by the word. The difficulty in defining Gnosticism is not entirely of recent origin. As early as 1910, a small book was published in London that in many ways foreshadowed current trends, including the difficulties in definition. The title of the work was Gnosticism: The Coming Apostasy; the author, a certain D.M. Panton, was an anxious defender of Christian orthodoxy, which he felt was menaced by an emerging Gnostic revival. Gnosticism, Panton wrote, had surfaced in the twentieth century in the forms of Theosophy, Christian Science, some forms of spiritualism, and in what was called the “New Theology,” which had been introduced primarily by German writers on religion. (A biography of Marcion by theologian Adolf von Harnack created much interest and controversy at that time.) While earlier crypto-Gnostics, such as Emanuel Swedenborg, William Blake, George Fox, and Elias Hicks camouflaged their heretical beliefs, Panton argued, twentieth-century Gnostics no longer bothered with concealment. The gnosticising movements of the early twentieth century, wrote Panton, were “frankly and jubilantly Gnostic”; their thought and their...

True Light of Christ

By BISHOP GEORGE BOYER True religion is based upon the premise that Truth, or the way of life as it really is, cannot be understood by a materialistic approach to life. Questions arising with regard to the materialistic approach and the true spiritual approach differ enormously because organised religion fits its tenets into crystallised ideas on life and being that create fear in the minds of those people who are then afraid to follow after their own heart lest the devil should snatch them into hell; whereas the true religion does not limit our search and findings to set forms and dogmas. Over the last century more information was made available to the general public about the origins of the Christian Church and it is known that it was at the Nicene Council in 325 A.D that certain dogmas were arranged at the behest of the Emperor Constantine who gave authority to beliefs put together by those Bishops who were present at the Council. It was an attempt to create a ‘religion’ to which all people should subscribe to bring harmony to the Roman Empire – but many of the Bishops withdrew before the final plan was drawn up. Thus a system was brought in which made all the European Christians slaves to an invented dogma, and subject to the ‘absolutes’ that the Church pronounced in the way of religion and science. We find that the idea of original sin did not enter into the Church until this time – meaning that before the fourth century the idea of sin and the devil was not taught and we find no such indications in the first-fruits of the teachings of Jeshua, and much earlier teachers. The ancient teachings from the myths and legends of the...

Gnosis vs Gnosticism

By BISHOP GEORGE BOYER There is much misunderstanding in the minds of the students of truth as to what is really meant by the word Gnosis. The word itself is a Greek word meaning knowledge, but it does not simply refer to the popular view or the assimilation of a lot of facts and figures. Gnosis refers to the deep inner knowledge relating to the true make-up of things: of the Cosmos in toto and of that Cause behind all manifestation: it transcends the doctrines and dogmas of any religion, ideology or creed; nor is the Gnosis related to any particular religion or following. The Christian student comes across this word in St Paul’s writings and it is used occasionally in the Gospels; and in one account by Jesus (Luke 11:52). To the Christian, Gnosis indicates the true knowledge of God. Whatever a sect or religion makes out of this can be purely speculative based upon personal concepts of what one believes the text matter to mean. This can have many variations according to how one has been brought up (programmed) to think in one’s youth or to what ethnic group one belongs – such is the complexity of a true interpretation of the Gnosis. Modern scholarship tends to separate the meaning of Gnosis from what is popularly understood to be Gnosticism – in just the same way as the true student of the Gnosis separates the true meaning of Christ from Christianity. It was in fact the institutionalised Church which classified any teachings other than their own particular doctrines and dogmas as Gnostic, and any teachings or practices they did not like they regarded as heresy, they labelledGnosticism in order to perpetuate a campaign of hatred against them, especially those groups which taught their people to be self-reliant...